NEW YORK

Joanne Segal Brandford

New Basketry

Joanne Segal Brandford ShoulderShoulder, circa 1986
Bamboo, paint: 8″ x 15″ x 9″
Lent by Jo Stealey

Joanne Brandford’s work is rooted in the ethnographic study of ancient textiles, particularly those of the natives of the North, Central, and Andean Americas. Her work is distinguished by its sculptural and innovative netting, knotting, lacing, and twining, and has been recognized with a New York State Artist’s Grant, a basketry residency at Manchester Polytechnic in England, a fellowship at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College, and a research fellowship in textile art at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard. She died in 1994.

Visit brandford-elliot-award.com
or nationalbasketry.org/basketry-as-art-is-our-main-focus-joanne-segal-brandford for more information.

 

Steph Gorin

Basket As Vessel

Stephanie Gorin #bringbackourgirls Detail#bringbackourgirls, 2015
Steel, paper, vinyl: 48″ x 30″ x 30″
Lent by the artist

Steph Gorin is an unapologetic feminist fiber artist whose work focuses on issues of social justice and gender equality throughout the world. She is interested in the use of technology, the internet, and social media in rapidly spreading awareness about these issues, and often highlights social media hashtags in her work.

In her recent work, she uses the non-traditional media of rebar and vinyl to construct large-scale baskets. The use of rebar is meant to evoke imprisonment or containment as her work often focuses on the oppression of women and girls. The vinyl strips consist of selected text and images, telling a story that is literally woven through each piece.

Visit www.stephgorin.com for more information.

 

John McQueen

New Basketry

John McQueen Out Of True

John McQueen Out Of TrueOut of True, 2014
Sticks, wood, waxed linen: 61″ x 16″ x 12″
Lent by the Duane Reed Gallery

John McQueen’s baskets are created from the twigs, bark, flowers, weeds, and vines he finds near his rural New York farm. Although his baskets take the shape of vessels, they do not function as containers and increasingly suggest the trees from which they emerge.

Visit www.duanereedgallery.com
or www.browngrotta.com/pages/mcqueen.php for more information.

 

Nancy Koenigsberg

Beyond the Basket

Nancy Koenigsberg CaughtCaught, 2006
Annealed steel wire, steel rods: 20″ x 35″ x 25″
Lent by the artist

Describing her work process and product, Nancy Koenigsberg says, “For the past twenty years my work has been concerned with interlocking lines and the spaces they form. My interest is in creating a sense of weightlessness and luminescence by the manipulation of narrow-gauge industrial wire. I am exploring the contradiction between metal elements known for their strength and durability and the delicacy of the textiles that are created. These lace-like layers of nets allow for transparency and the passage of light and the formation of shadows. In other works the nets are thickly layered and become almost opaque. Lines cross and re-cross to create a complex fabric and tangle of shadows. The objects appear fragile, but I seek to maintain their strength through the use of these metals.”

Visit www.nancykoenigsberg.com for more information.

 

Biba Schutz

Beyond the Basket

Biba Schutz Charlotte RusseCharlotte Russe, 2010
Bronze, copper, steel: 13″ x 10″ x 10″
Lent by the artist

Biba Schutz says, “I create forms that bring mystery to the visual and tactile sense. Front, interior, and back surfaces interact, drawing the eye into a drama of shifting curves and textures. I’ve created language with the armature and the use of wire. I build volume, space, texture and color with these threads of wire. Though the work may look spontaneous it is carefully calculated to create its form, movement and rhythm. My fantasy is to be inside the work…encouraging visual and emotional exploration.”

Visit www.bibaschutz.com for more information.

 

Karyl Sisson

New Basketry

Karyl Sisson Mixing Bowls

Karyl Sisson Mixing BowlsMixing Bowls, 2003
Vintage cloth tape measures, polymer: 1.75″ x 2″ and 2.5″ x 3.25″ and 3.1″ x 4.1″
Lent by the Barn Gallery at Stonover Farm

Drawn to “undervalued and overlooked materials” and inspired by tramp art and whittling, Karyl Sisson uses the simple interlocking techniques of basketry and needlework to build sculptural forms using collected sewing notions, bobby pins, hair clips and curlers, and paper drinking straws. She notes, “The artwork, like the process that creates it, is laden with patterning and repetition. Often the size of the sculpture is dictated by the amount of material I have collected and by what I can manage by hand. I enjoy working with my hands and find that the tactile and suggestive nature of the forms evokes physical and psychological connections that are meaningful to me.”

Visit www.karylsisson.com for more information.

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